Melbourne Monochrome

© John Reynoldson

John Reynoldson is a budding photographer based in Melbourne, Australia. Equipped with his Sony a6000, he has recently put together a series of black and white images showcasing personal moments of interest around Melbourne as he works around during his work breaks. Below are a few of his shots form his series Melbourne Monochrome.

“I like to experiment with Instagram’s square grid layout by posting large images and triptychs, with the aim of having each part of an image as visually interesting as its whole.”

The Hall

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

The Melbourne Town Hall is known for its tall, grandiose front facade, however the sloping northern side with its staggered fence tapering off the view of this particular set of windows has always caught my eye.

Solitary

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

Webb Bridge  never ceases to inspire – its internal complexity is held together by an organic, serpentine form. Where my photography is generally devoid to people, the solitary silhouette of a man on his evening walk was the human element that brought this scene together.

The Audience

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

Urban exploration is fueled by the desire to see places rarely explored or rarely seen in a particular way. I stumbled upon an empty Sidney Myer Music Bowl in the middle of the night and this photo basically took itself.

Emporium

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

The Emporium shopping centre in the Melbourne CBD is a masterpiece of architecture, regardless of whether you’re looking up, down, forward or through. I often walk through it on my way from Melbourne Central to work, and take photos when it inspires me.

Unity

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

Melbourne is famous for its arcades, lane ways and street art. Union Lane’s gritty textures are worthy of a vertical panoramic.

Wanderings

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

Working 9-5 in the CBD, a lot of the shots I take are on my breaks, where I will wander through places new or familiar with eyes that need refreshing. This minimalist capture is from the reverse side of the Melbourne Arts Centre, its famous roof referenced only slightly through reflections in the upper-level windows,

Chaos

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

The visual appeal of a particular scene is based on how the brain processes the chaos and order in what lies before it. A pattern is only as interesting as the components that make it and the others that break it.

Four Seconds

© John Reynoldson
© John Reynoldson

A four second exposure of the 150 year old GPO building in Melbourne, sitting silently amongst the aromas of coffee and buzz of Bourke Street mall.

Check out more great photos on his instagram and website.